Stuart McKill: giving merchants improved access to engineered timber products.

Timber truss plants open in SW

Published:  13 May, 2009

CHORLEY: Pasquill Roof Trusses, part of Saint-Gobain Building Distribution’s Timber Group, has announced a major investment in two truss plants to be opened in Bodmin and Taunton. The investment aims to support merchants and contractors operating throughout the South West and will create 18 new jobs.

Pasquill is now one of the largest suppliers of engineered timber in the UK. It has also invested in a new Posi-joist production line at its Redhill site to strengthen its capabilities to supply this product in the southern half of the country.

“We believe it is essential that we invest in modern methods of construction and manufacturing excellence,” says Stuart McKill, managing director of Pasquill. “These investments will enable us to expand the range of sustainable products we provide to our customers."

"It will also give merchants operating in the South and South West much improved access to high quality engineered timber products, such as roof trusses, I-joists and roof and floor cassettes.

"By expanding our branch network and enhancing our manufacturing capabilities, we can give merchants and contractors the benefits of a local service provided by a national supplier that has design and manufacturing expertise.”

Pasquill, he adds, strengthened its brand presence and national network at the end of last year, when it integrated its business by merging with sister company. RK Timber Engineering.

 

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