Successful pilot: OLB's benchmarking pilot was well received

Thumbs up for online benchmarking

Published:  13 May, 2009

LONDON: On Line Benchmarking (OLB) is now available across all sectors within the freight transport industry through the Freight Best Practice programme. This follows a successful pilot within the primary distribution and aggregates sectors,

OLB is seen as the next generation in benchmarking and is designed to allow operators to compare their performance with that of similar operators, instantly and anonymously for free.

By benchmarking performance, operators gain a thorough understanding of how they are performing against best-in-class, are able to identify areas for improvement and can improve the efficiency of their operation.

Participants in the pilot were full of praise for this new system. Mike MacDougall, manager for PS Transport, based in Grimsby says: "The benchmarking process has helped us to identify where we are as a business across a wide range of hauliers. It also helped us to identify areas for on which to focus  in the future, particularly with regards to fuel interventions."

Positive feedback was also received from Eddie Green, managing director of Norfolkline. "We have been using OLB since the pilot launched, and have found it to be a very useful tool, particularly for validating our fleet's MPG performance against our existing procedures.

"The OLB system has allowed us to compare our operational performance on an external basis with other comparable operators. We are committed to using the system across more depots and will continue to assist in the future development of OLB."

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