Keeping in front of the public.

Topps Tiles upbeat and paying dividends

Published:  02 December, 2010

MANCHESTER: Tile and wood flooring retailer, Topps Tiles, is upbeat about its prospects in the face of tough economic headwinds.

Its focus on customer service has paid off and it will restart its dividend, said the company.

Yesterday, Matthew Williams chief executive, said: "I don't  see why we cannot continue to take market share. But, if the market is down, there is little we can do apart from continue to outperform that market."

Mr Williams said Topps Tiles was winning share both from large DIY sheds – Kingfisher's B&Q, Home Retail's Homebase and Travis Perkins's Wickes – as well as from small independent players.

He was speaking after the 312-store Topps Tiles met forecasts with a 7% fall in full-year profit, resumed dividend payments and reported solid current trading.

Sales at stores open over a year were up 3.2% in the first seven weeks of the company's new financial year.

Arden Partners analyst Nick Bubb said the current trading data was "encouraging and better than expected".

Mr Williams said there was pent-up demand for tiling projects, which typically average £300-£350. "At some stage these things have to start coming through because people need to get on with life."

Topps made an underlying pre-tax profit of £16.3m in the 53 weeks to 2 October, in line with analyst forecasts of £14.5m to £16.6m and up from £17.5m in 2008-09.

Revenue rose 2% to £182m, with sales at stores open over a year up 1.7%.

Topps, which cut net debt by £22.1m to £49.1m, is paying a final dividend of 1p.

Yesterday its shares closed up 1.69% at 60p.

Sign Up

For the Builders' Merchants News enewsletter.

In the spotlight

Recruitment

Builders Merchants Vacancies – UK Wide

We work closely with the National and Large Independent Builders Merchants as well as Manufacturers & Distributors. We have vacancies all over the UK for those who work within the Building Supplies sector.

Guest Blog by Simon Damp

Is DIY a lost art?

As time goes by, the art of do-it-yourself when it comes to activities around the home and garden is fast becoming more and more of a lost art.