Simon Blaxill (left) and Dr Fabrizio Casale in front of one of the restored panels.

Historic glass panels re-installed in Colchester children’s ward

Published:  10 December, 2012

Four beautiful etched glass panels have been restored and returned to Colchester’s children’s ward by building and glass supplies company Kent Blaxill, more than half a century after they were first installed.

The panels were unveiled in their new home in the Children’s Unit at Colchester General Hospital recently by Colchester Medical Society and Kent Blaxill, who were both responsible for the project.

The panels, etched with images of a deer, squirrel, field mouse and rabbit, were originally unveiled in the new children’s ward (also known as Ward 5) at Essex County Hospital after it reopened on 1 October 1957 following a refurbishment. The panels had been supplied by Kent Blaxill.

However, when the ward moved to new premises in 1984, the panels were put into storage and forgotten about.

Dr Fabrizio Casale, Colchester Medical Society’s archivist, said: “After the new Children’s Unit opened, I arranged for them to be removed and for Kent Blaxill to restore, frame and install them, which they did, free of charge.”

Simon Blaxill, Kent Blaxill managing director, said: “When asked by Dr Casale to reinstall the etched panels into the modern children’s ward I was pleased to offer our glass services, under Neil Currell, who organised everything from framing to the sand blasting of the script. I very much hope they will continue to be enjoyed by another generation.”

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